Other Weeds.
These weeds are not as pervasive as bitou and lantana, but still pose a threat. They tend to occur in smaller, more isolated patches. While individually their numbers may be small, collectively they require constant vigilance and follow-up. GPS is a useful tool with these weeds as the position of individual outbreaks can be easily noted for return visits.

None Such

Senna Bush.
Senna Bush. Occurs in patches here and there, often in damp gullies. Tough-rooted plant, less susceptible to poison, and hard to pull up by hand. Seed pod collection reduces subsequent regrowth. Easy to locate between late February and April when their yellow flowers make them stand-out. Produces large numbers of seedlings.

See a video about Senna Bush here. This video, together with others on this page, was produced by the Pittwater Eco-warriors.


None Such

Moth Vine.
Moth Vine Fluffy seeds that are airborne, and often used by birds as nesting material. Seeds prolifically and climbs the tallest trees, smothering them in the process. When pulled, the tap roots break off and will re-sprout. Can easily be mistaken for the local native Marsdenia, so if not sure ask for it to be identified

See a video about Moth Vine here.


None Such

Ochna Berries
Ochna. The fruit is very attractive to birds - this means that the plants spread widely, and are found in bush areas well away from the parent plant. The stems are tough and the plants hard to kill: scrape and paint is most effective on smaller bushes; larger stemmed plants may need to be drilled and injected with glyphosate. "Regular" style cut-and-paint often results in large number of sucker-seedlings being produced which are then time-consuming and difficult to destroy.

See a video about Ochna here.


None Such

Mother of Millions
Mother of Millions. Produces clusters of reddish-coloured flowers in winter. Very poisonous to animals and humans, and causes many cattle deaths each year. Forms dense cover in grasslands and open woodlands. Reproduces by forming tiny plantlets on the leaf margins - which then spread via run-off during rains. Likes dry, rocky and stony habitats with sandy soil. Occurs near Little Bay picnic area, Main Beach, and around the lighthouse.

None Such

Morning Glory
Morning Glory. Spreads quickly,either forming a dense mat along the ground or climbing on any vertical support into the canopy - sometimes as high as 10 meters. Infestations can smother native vegetation, thus reducing bio-diversity and displacing native animals due to habitat destruction.

None Such

Groundsel Flowers
Groundsel. A serious weed of wetland, wetland margins, horticultural land, and forests. Likes damp areas and is found along Saltwater Creek and Saltwater Lagoon. This weed is a prolific seeder and the plants can form dense mats.

None Such

Asparagus Fern
Asparagus Fern. A tough green creeper with spiny stems. The root system is a mass of fibrous roots and fleshy bulbs, used by the plant for water storage. The seeds are readily spread by birds. Can be sprayed, or the "crown" or rhizome cut out with a small saw. Occurs on on Main Beach, Back Beach, around the gaol, Little Bay and recently on Gap Beach,

See a video about Asparagus Fern here.


None Such

Glory Lily
Glory Lily. All parts of the plant are highly toxic, and have caused deaths in humans and as well as animals. Forms dense understory carpets in dune areas and competes with native flora. Often appears following Bitou control and is extremely difficult to eradicate. The plant flowers and can be treated by spraying in March and October; the plant dies down for the rest of the year

None Such

Madeira Vine.
Madeira Vine, also known as lamb's tail or potato vine, is a vigorous climber to 40m, smothering and collapsing small trees. In autumn it produces flower spikes resembling lamb's tails. Thousands of aerial tubers are produced along the stems, which fall to the ground, where they can remain dormant for several seasons, and then sprout.

See a video about Madeira Vine here.


Other Weeds that have not occured in our area (yet!) include Balloon Vine, Gazania, and Privet. At one stage in 2010 we detected an outbreak of Sticky Weed (parietaria judaica sp) in the caravan park, but this has been cleared without re-appearance.